UNICEF On Standby To Support Governments of Samoa, Tonga and Fiji as Cyclone Gita intensifies

SUVA, 13 February 2018 – As Tropical Cyclone Gita intensifies, the strongest storm to ever hit Tonga, and heads towards Fiji, UNICEF offers its support to the affected Pacific island countries of Samoa, Tonga and Fiji.

“UNICEF is ready to support the Governments of Tonga and Samoa respond to the emergencies caused by Tropical Cyclone Gita. We are also on standby to provide support to the Government of Fiji as they brace for Cyclone Gita,” said Sheldon Yett, UNICEF Pacific Representative.

In Tonga, about 80,000 people, including 32,000 children, are at risk from the Category 4 Tropical Cyclone Gita that hit on Monday night, with widespread damage to infrastructure and floods reported.

“UNICEF is prepared to support the governments’ response, to ensure urgent life-saving support is provided, including access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene for those families affected,” he added.

UNICEF is working closely with the Tongan National Emergency Office and the UN Coordination office in Tonga to coordinate activities and respond as required. Emergency supplies including portable water field test kits, to check for safety of drinking water; Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Kits, which include purification tablets; water containers and hygiene products such as soap and menstrual hygiene products; inter-agency emergency health kits that include medicines, micronutrient powders, Vitamin A capsules; and tents, are being prepositioned for shipment to Tonga.

In Samoa, basic emergency supplies are already available and have been offered to the Samoan government if required to support the needs of affected children and families affected.

Supplies are also prepositioned in Fiji for use to affected areas and the National Disaster Management Office in Fiji have been offered the use of RapidPro – an open-source platform of applications that can help the government deliver information quickly and connect communities to lifesaving services through the short message service (SMS) for mobile phones.#####

For more information, please contact:
Cate Heinrich, UNICEF Pacific,
Tel: +679 9925 606, cheinrich@unicef.org

Donna Hoerder
Communication Specialist – External Relations,
UNICEF Pacific
Phone: (679) 323-6100 Email: dhoerder@unicef.org

 

Opening Remarks By UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein At a Press Conference During His Mission to Fiji

12 February (Suva) Climate change has a profound impact on a wide variety of human rights including rights to life, self-determination, development, food, health, water and sanitation and housing.
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International Day of Women and Girls in Science 11 February

To mark this International Day of Women and Girls in Science, we bring you the story of Katherine Jin – a young female scientist and how her scientific invention helps safeguard health workers.

The International Day of Women and Girls in Science, celebrated each year on 11 February, was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly to promote full and equal access to and participation in science for women and girls. This Day is a reminder that women and girls play a critical role in science and technology communities and that their participation should be strengthened. The celebration is led by UNESCO and UN-Women, in collaboration with institutions and civil society partners that promote women and girls’ access to and participation in science.

World Wetlands Day 2 February at Jerrabomberra Wetlands Canberra

Half of humanity about 4 billion people live in urban areas today. By 2050 that proportion will reach 66% as people move to cities in search of jobs and a vibrant social life. Cities account for around 80% of global economic output. As cities expand and demand for land increases, the tendency is to encroach on wetlands, they are degraded, filled in and built upon. Yet when left intact or restored, urban wetlands make cities liveable. More

We visited the Jerrabomberra Wetlands to see how the Wetlands assisted the wildlife, environment and people of Canberra.

Managing Migration Is One Of The Most Urgent And Profound Tests Of International Cooperation In Our Time

“Migration is an expanding global reality” United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres maintains in his report released today. “The time for debating the need for cooperation in this field is past”, and “managing it is one of the most urgent and profound tests of international cooperation of our time.”

Making Migration Work for All, the report released to the UN General Assembly on 11 January 2018, is the Secretary-General’s contribution to the process of developing a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. The report offers the Secretary-General’s vision for constructive international cooperation, examining how to better manage migration, for the benefit of all – the migrants themselves, their host communities and their societies of origin.
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For the Report and Other Related Information Please Go to the Dedicated Website 

Link

10 January 2018 – At a special summit at United Nations Headquarters in New York, universities, led by De Montfort University (DMU), spotlighted ideas for practical ways they can use the skills, experience and voluntary power on their campuses to support those in need in their local areas.

“Migration has become a scary word in some parts of the world. Some people use it to evoke apocalyptic scenarios,” Maher Nasser, the Director of the Outreach Division in the UN Department of Public Information told the gathering, pointing out that when well-managed, migration brings wealth and opportunities, especially when it is an individual’s choice as opposed to a necessity.
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2017 Year in Review

The year 2017 marked a shift in leadership at the United Nations as Secretary-General António Guterres began his term at a time of heightened global challenges. The world’s fastest-growing refugee crisis unfolded in Myanmar while the threat of famine loomed over Yemen, South Sudan, Nigeria and Somalia. Resolved to forestall crises before they occur, Secretary-General Guterres launched a series of reforms aimed at advancing meditation and prevention. These build on past successes, including the proud legacy left by the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, which closed its doors after reshaping the global approach to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. As the United Nations rises to the world’s collective security challenges, the voices of the people most affected resound with greater meaning for our common future.