Tag Archives: Climate Change

Statement by the UN Secretary-General on the IPCC Special Report Global Warming of 1.5 ºC

Earlier today the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its long-awaited special report on global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

This report by the world’s leading climate scientists is an ear-splitting wake-up call to the world. It confirms that climate change is running faster than we are – and we are running out of time.

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Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C approved by governments

Incheon, Republic of Korea, October 8 – Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, the IPCC said in a new assessment. With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C could go hand in hand with ensuring a more sustainable and equitable society, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said on Monday.

The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C was approved by the IPCC on Saturday in Incheon, Republic of Korea. It will be a key scientific input into the Katowice Climate Change Conference in Poland in December, when governments review the Paris Agreement to tackle climate change.  More

Or you can watch the archived press conference from today here ( starts about ten minutes in)

The IPCC Will Release An Important Report–The IPCC Special Report Global Warming of 1.5 ºC – On Monday, 8 October in Incheon, Republic of Korea.

The report comes soon after the UN Secretary-General raised the alarm about the urgent need for greater climate ambition and action in a speech on 10 September.

It is an assessment of more than 30,000 scientific publications.

There is no draft of the report to share beforehand, as it is subject to approval by the Panel, which is comprised of Member States.

The IPCC will present the Summary for Policymakers of the report at a press conference in Incheon, Republic of Korea on Monday 8 October at 10 a.m. local time.

It will be possible to follow this press conference (and for the media to submit questions) remotely, without being in Incheon in person, as it will be live-streamed see this link (https://www.ipcc.ch/ ).

(For example 10 a.m. in Incheon is 13:00 in Suva, 12:00 in Sydney, 10:00 in Tokyo, 09:00 in Beijing, 06:30 in New Delhi, 03:00 in Johannesburg, Paris and Brussels, 02:00 in London, 22:00 (Sunday 7 October) in São Paulo, and 21:00 (Sunday 7 October) in New York.)

There is also an advisory listing experts available for interview on 8 October and explaining the process for requesting interviews. The link is here:
http://www.ipcc.ch/news_and_events/ma-sr15-authors.shtml

WMO has shared a brief providing the context and explanation of key concepts for policymakers, media and others about the Special Report on 1.5°C. This brief, produced prior to the release of the report, does not contain results from the report itself.

The brief can be downloaded at
https://library.wmo.int/index.php?lvl=notice_display&id=20660#.W7SVxRMzYdU

The IPCC website is https://www.ipcc.ch/

Background: Governments adopted the Paris Agreement in December 2015, setting a target of holding global warming well below 2 ºC above pre-industrial levels while pursuing efforts to keep it below 1.5 ºC. This goal will be achieved by actions set by each government for themselves, known as Nationally Determined Contributions. The Paris Agreement includes regular reviews to see whether the target remains appropriate and whether the Nationally Determined Contributions and their implementation are on track to deliver it. An initial review takes place at COP24 in Katowice, Poland, this December, known as the Talanoa Dialogue.

At the time the Paris Agreement was adopted, relatively little was known about the risks that could be avoided in a world where the rise of temperature was limited to 1.5 ºC compared with a 2ºC warmer world, or about the pathway of greenhouse gas emissions compatible with limiting global warming to 1.5 ºC. As a result, governments asked IPCC to prepare a report on warming of 1.5 ºC to be delivered in 2018. The IPCC will consider this report in Incheon, Republic of Korea, on 1-5 October.

For more information, contact Dan Shepard, shepard@un.org ( NY Based)
The UN Secretary-General is expected to release a statement after the Report is released.

‘Direct Existential Threat’ Of Climate Change Nears Point Of No Return, Warns UN chief

The world risks crossing the point of no return on climate change, with disastrous consequences for people across the planet and the natural systems that sustain them, the United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres warned on Monday, calling for more leadership and greater ambition for climate action, to reverse course. More

Opening Remarks By UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein At a Press Conference During His Mission to Fiji

12 February (Suva) Climate change has a profound impact on a wide variety of human rights including rights to life, self-determination, development, food, health, water and sanitation and housing.
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UN Secretary-General at UN Climate Change Conference – COP23

 

United Nations – Remarks by the UN Secretary-General António Guterres at the High-level event at COP23, the UN Climate Change Conference – November 2017 in Bonn, Germany.

“…The catastrophic effects of climate change are upon us.

And the voice of small island State that are on the frontlines of the impact of climate change must the voice of us all.

In the battlefield, when the frontline is decimated, the whole army is lost. And the same would happen to the planet with climate change.

Floods, fires, extreme storms and drought are growing in intensity and frequency.

Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are higher than they have been for 800,000 years.

Climate change is the defining threat of our time.

Our duty — to each other and to future generations — is to raise ambition.

We need to do more on five ambition action areas: emissions, adaptation, finance, partnerships and leadership.”
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Read More: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp…

Emissions Gap Report 2017: Governments, non-state actors must do more to reach Paris Agreement

Governments and non-state actors need to deliver an urgent increase in ambition to ensure the Paris Agreement goals can still be met, according to a new UN assessment.

The eighth edition of UN Environment’s Emissions Gap report, released ahead of the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, finds that national pledges only bring a third of the reduction in emissions required by 2030 to meet climate targets, with private sector and sub-national action not increasing at a rate that would help close this worrying gap.

For more Information and to access report

Note to Correspondents on the Paris Climate Change Agreement

In answers to questions received, I can confirm that today, 4 August 2017,
the Secretary-General received, in his capacity as Depositary of the Paris Agreement, a communication from the Permanent Representative of the United States of America expressing the intention of the United States to exercise its right to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, as soon as it is eligible to do so under the Agreement, unless it identifies suitable terms for reengagement. The Secretary General welcomes any effort to reengage in the Paris Agreement by the United States.

Under article 28 of the Paris Agreement, a Party may withdraw at any time after three years from the date on which the Agreement has entered into force for that Party, and such withdrawal takes effect upon expiry of one year from the date of receipt by the Depositary of the notification of withdrawal. The United States accepted the Paris Agreement on 3 September 2016 and the Agreement entered into force for the United States on 4 November 2016.

The Secretary-General will circulate the text of this communication as a depositary notification, in English and French, early next week.

As the Secretary-General said in a statement on 1 June 2017, the decision by the United States to withdraw from the Paris Agreement is a major disappointment for global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote global security. It is crucial that the United States remains a leader on climate and sustainable development. Climate change is impacting now. He looks forward to engaging with the American government and all other actors in the United States and around the world to build the sustainable future for our children and future generations.

Stéphane Dujarric
Spokesman for the Secretary-General

New York
4 August 2017