Tag Archives: Climate Change

UN Secretary-General at UN Climate Change Conference – COP23

 

United Nations – Remarks by the UN Secretary-General António Guterres at the High-level event at COP23, the UN Climate Change Conference – November 2017 in Bonn, Germany.

“…The catastrophic effects of climate change are upon us.

And the voice of small island State that are on the frontlines of the impact of climate change must the voice of us all.

In the battlefield, when the frontline is decimated, the whole army is lost. And the same would happen to the planet with climate change.

Floods, fires, extreme storms and drought are growing in intensity and frequency.

Atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are higher than they have been for 800,000 years.

Climate change is the defining threat of our time.

Our duty — to each other and to future generations — is to raise ambition.

We need to do more on five ambition action areas: emissions, adaptation, finance, partnerships and leadership.”
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Read More: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp…

Emissions Gap Report 2017: Governments, non-state actors must do more to reach Paris Agreement

Governments and non-state actors need to deliver an urgent increase in ambition to ensure the Paris Agreement goals can still be met, according to a new UN assessment.

The eighth edition of UN Environment’s Emissions Gap report, released ahead of the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, finds that national pledges only bring a third of the reduction in emissions required by 2030 to meet climate targets, with private sector and sub-national action not increasing at a rate that would help close this worrying gap.

For more Information and to access report

Note to Correspondents on the Paris Climate Change Agreement

In answers to questions received, I can confirm that today, 4 August 2017,
the Secretary-General received, in his capacity as Depositary of the Paris Agreement, a communication from the Permanent Representative of the United States of America expressing the intention of the United States to exercise its right to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, as soon as it is eligible to do so under the Agreement, unless it identifies suitable terms for reengagement. The Secretary General welcomes any effort to reengage in the Paris Agreement by the United States.

Under article 28 of the Paris Agreement, a Party may withdraw at any time after three years from the date on which the Agreement has entered into force for that Party, and such withdrawal takes effect upon expiry of one year from the date of receipt by the Depositary of the notification of withdrawal. The United States accepted the Paris Agreement on 3 September 2016 and the Agreement entered into force for the United States on 4 November 2016.

The Secretary-General will circulate the text of this communication as a depositary notification, in English and French, early next week.

As the Secretary-General said in a statement on 1 June 2017, the decision by the United States to withdraw from the Paris Agreement is a major disappointment for global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote global security. It is crucial that the United States remains a leader on climate and sustainable development. Climate change is impacting now. He looks forward to engaging with the American government and all other actors in the United States and around the world to build the sustainable future for our children and future generations.

Stéphane Dujarric
Spokesman for the Secretary-General

New York
4 August 2017

UN Chief António Guterres Calls for Climate Action

Highlighting the seriousness of the impact of climate change on the planet and its inhabitants, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has called for sustained action to meet the global challenge and to ensure a peaceful and sustainable future for all. Speaking to a gathering of students, business leaders and academics at the New York University Stern School of Business, Secretary-General Guterres urged the world to rally behind the Paris Agreement

Leading Weather Presenters Boost Climate Communication

Climate Without Borders Launched in Brussels

An international group of weather presenters on Tuesday officially launched the organization Climate Without Borders in Brussels, designed to connect, equip and empower other weather presenters around the world to accurately report and inform audiences about climate science and climate action.

The new group is supported by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the World Meteorological Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. More

Countries set to agree on decisive and urgent actions to restore marine world to health as Ocean Conference concludes

Universal agreement on need for measures to reverse ocean deterioration

New York, 9 June—The 193 Member States of the United Nations unanimously agreed to a set of measures that will begin the reversal of the decline of the ocean’s health as the five-day Ocean Conference concluded today. The outcome document, together with more than 1,300 commitments to action, marks a breakthrough in the global approach to the management and conservation of the ocean.

The Ocean Conference, the first UN conference of its kind on the issue has raised global consciousness of ocean problems ranging from marine pollution to illegal and over fishing, from ocean acidification to lack of high seas governance. By including all stakeholders in the discussions, the Conference produced a comprehensive and actionable range of solutions.

Statement attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on the US decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement

The decision by the United States to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change is a major disappointment for global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote global security.

The Paris Agreement was adopted by all the world’s nations in 2015 because they recognize the immense harm that climate change is already causing and the enormous opportunity that climate action presents. It offers a meaningful yet flexible framework for action by all countries.

The transformation envisaged in the Paris Agreement is already underway. The Secretary-General remains confident that cities, states and businesses within the United States — along with other countries — will continue to demonstrate vision and leadership by working for the low-carbon, resilient economic growth that will create quality jobs and markets for 21st century prosperity.

It is crucial that the United States remains a leader on environmental issues.

The Secretary-General looks forward to engaging with the American government and all actors in the United States and around the world to build the sustainable future on which our grandchildren depend.

Stéphane Dujarric, Spokesman for the Secretary-General

New York, 1 June 2017

The Need to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals in Papua New Guinea

How are people’s lives linked to the Sustainable Development Goals? This film tells the stories of three families in the Coastal, Highlands and Central regions of Papua New Guinea. It documents the challenges they face in their daily lives, how they are over coming these and their aspirations for the future.

Film created by UN Office PNG

New Research Predicts The Future Of Coral Reefs Under Climate Change

coral-bleaching-on-the-great-barrier-reef_paul-marshall• If current trends continue, severe bleaching will occur every year on 99% of the world’s coral reefs within this century
• More ambitious emissions reductions may give reefs an average of 11 extra years before annual bleaching strikes
• High-resolution predictions of annual coral bleaching can help prioritize reefs for conservation

5 January 2017 – New climate model projections of the world’s coral reefs reveal which reefs will be hit first by annual coral bleaching, an event that poses the gravest threat to one of the Earth’s most important ecosystems.
These high-resolution projections, based on global climate models, predict when and where annual coral bleaching will occur. The projections show that reefs in Taiwan and around the Turks and Caicos archipelago will be among the world’s first to experience annual bleaching.

Full Press Release

Provisional WMO Statement on the Status of the Global Climate in 2016

wmo

wmo-graph-1It is very likely that 2016 will be the hottest year on record, with global temperatures even higher than the record-breaking temperatures in 2015. Preliminary data shows that 2016’s global temperatures are approximately 1.2° Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to an assessment by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Global temperatures for January to September 2016 have been about 0.88° Celsius (1.58°F) above the average (14°C) for the 1961-1990 reference period, which is used by WMO as a baseline. Temperatures spiked in the early months of the year because of the powerful El Niño event of 2015-16. Preliminary data for October indicate that they are at a sufficiently high level for 2016 to remain on track for the title of hottest year on record. This would mean that 16 of the 17 hottest years on record have been this century (1998 was the other one).