Tag Archives: Climate Change

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL REMARKS AT OPENING OF COP24
Katowice, 3 December 2018
AS DELIVERED

Excellencies, Distinguished delegates, Ladies and gentlemen, Welcome to COP 24.

I thank President Duda, Minister Kowalczyk and COP President Designate Mijal Kurtyka for their warm welcome. We are in trouble. We are in deep trouble with climate change.

Climate change is running faster than we are and we must catch up sooner rather than later before it is too late.For many, people, regions even countries this is already a matter of life and death.

This meeting is the most important gathering on climate change since the Paris Agreement was signed. It is hard to overstate the urgency of our situation.

Even as we witness devastating climate impacts causing havoc across the world, we are still not doing enough, nor moving fast enough, to prevent irreversible and catastrophic climate disruption.  More

COP24: UN climate change conference, what’s at stake and what you need to know

As global temperatures continue to rise, climate action is lagging and the window of opportunity is closing. On Sunday, the United Nations will kick off critical negotiations on how to address the problem collectively and urgently, during a two-week climate change conference in Katowice, Poland, known as “COP24”.

Thousands of world leaders, experts, activists, creative thinkers, and private sector and local community representatives will gather to work on a collective action plan to realize critical commitments made by all the countries of the world in Paris, three years ago.

UN News put together this guide to COP 24 to answer some of the biggest questions you may have and make sure you’re all caught up, with a ringside seat on the action.

Climate Change Signals and Impacts Continue in 2018

The long-term warming trend has continued in 2018, with the average global temperature set to be the fourth highest on record. The 20 warmest years on record have been in the past 22 years, with the top four in the past four years, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Other tell-tale signs of climate change, including sea level rise, ocean heat and acidification and sea-ice and glacier melt continue, whilst extreme weather left a trail of devastation on all continents, according to the WMO provisional Statement on the State of the Climate in 2018. It includes details of impacts of climate change based on contributions from a wide range of United Nations partners. More

Statement by the UN Secretary-General on the IPCC Special Report Global Warming of 1.5 ºC

Earlier today the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its long-awaited special report on global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius.

This report by the world’s leading climate scientists is an ear-splitting wake-up call to the world. It confirms that climate change is running faster than we are – and we are running out of time.

More

Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C approved by governments

Incheon, Republic of Korea, October 8 – Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society, the IPCC said in a new assessment. With clear benefits to people and natural ecosystems, limiting global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C could go hand in hand with ensuring a more sustainable and equitable society, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said on Monday.

The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C was approved by the IPCC on Saturday in Incheon, Republic of Korea. It will be a key scientific input into the Katowice Climate Change Conference in Poland in December, when governments review the Paris Agreement to tackle climate change.  More

Or you can watch the archived press conference from today here ( starts about ten minutes in)

The IPCC Will Release An Important Report–The IPCC Special Report Global Warming of 1.5 ºC – On Monday, 8 October in Incheon, Republic of Korea.

The report comes soon after the UN Secretary-General raised the alarm about the urgent need for greater climate ambition and action in a speech on 10 September.

It is an assessment of more than 30,000 scientific publications.

There is no draft of the report to share beforehand, as it is subject to approval by the Panel, which is comprised of Member States.

The IPCC will present the Summary for Policymakers of the report at a press conference in Incheon, Republic of Korea on Monday 8 October at 10 a.m. local time.

It will be possible to follow this press conference (and for the media to submit questions) remotely, without being in Incheon in person, as it will be live-streamed see this link (https://www.ipcc.ch/ ).

(For example 10 a.m. in Incheon is 13:00 in Suva, 12:00 in Sydney, 10:00 in Tokyo, 09:00 in Beijing, 06:30 in New Delhi, 03:00 in Johannesburg, Paris and Brussels, 02:00 in London, 22:00 (Sunday 7 October) in São Paulo, and 21:00 (Sunday 7 October) in New York.)

There is also an advisory listing experts available for interview on 8 October and explaining the process for requesting interviews. The link is here:
http://www.ipcc.ch/news_and_events/ma-sr15-authors.shtml

WMO has shared a brief providing the context and explanation of key concepts for policymakers, media and others about the Special Report on 1.5°C. This brief, produced prior to the release of the report, does not contain results from the report itself.

The brief can be downloaded at
https://library.wmo.int/index.php?lvl=notice_display&id=20660#.W7SVxRMzYdU

The IPCC website is https://www.ipcc.ch/

Background: Governments adopted the Paris Agreement in December 2015, setting a target of holding global warming well below 2 ºC above pre-industrial levels while pursuing efforts to keep it below 1.5 ºC. This goal will be achieved by actions set by each government for themselves, known as Nationally Determined Contributions. The Paris Agreement includes regular reviews to see whether the target remains appropriate and whether the Nationally Determined Contributions and their implementation are on track to deliver it. An initial review takes place at COP24 in Katowice, Poland, this December, known as the Talanoa Dialogue.

At the time the Paris Agreement was adopted, relatively little was known about the risks that could be avoided in a world where the rise of temperature was limited to 1.5 ºC compared with a 2ºC warmer world, or about the pathway of greenhouse gas emissions compatible with limiting global warming to 1.5 ºC. As a result, governments asked IPCC to prepare a report on warming of 1.5 ºC to be delivered in 2018. The IPCC will consider this report in Incheon, Republic of Korea, on 1-5 October.

For more information, contact Dan Shepard, shepard@un.org ( NY Based)
The UN Secretary-General is expected to release a statement after the Report is released.

‘Direct Existential Threat’ Of Climate Change Nears Point Of No Return, Warns UN chief

The world risks crossing the point of no return on climate change, with disastrous consequences for people across the planet and the natural systems that sustain them, the United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres warned on Monday, calling for more leadership and greater ambition for climate action, to reverse course. More

Opening Remarks By UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein At a Press Conference During His Mission to Fiji

12 February (Suva) Climate change has a profound impact on a wide variety of human rights including rights to life, self-determination, development, food, health, water and sanitation and housing.
More