Tag Archives: discrimination

Launch of the 2016 Human Development Report – ‘Human Development for Everyone’,

World’s most marginalized still left behind by global development priorities: UNDP report

Photo: UNDP Peru / Mónica Suárez

Millions of people are not benefiting from progress, with the gap set to widen unless deeprooted development barriers, including discrimination and unequal political participation, are tackled.

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Administrator UNDP Helen Clark Speech at Launch of the Report

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“All Australians have a role to play in ending racism and xenophobia,” says UN expert

GENEVA (7 December 2016) – United Nations human rights expert Mutuma Ruteere called on all Australians to strengthen efforts to end racism, xenophobia and other forms of racial discrimination in the country, especially against indigenous people, migrants, refugees and asylum-seekers, Muslims, and persons of African descent.

“The elimination of racism, xenophobia and discrimination will not happen unless it is led by the most senior political leadership and unless institutions such as the media play a constructive role,” said the UN Special Rapporteur on racism at the end of a fact-finding visit* to Australia.

Press Statement

Delivered by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance
Mr. Mutuma Ruteere
 5 May 2016 in Canberra, Australia

Ladies and Gentlemen, I would like start by acknowledging the traditional owners of the land we are gathered upon today and pay my respects to their Elders past, present and future. I undertook a visit to Australia from 28 November to 5 December 2016, which is a follow-up visit of my predecessor in 2001. During my visit, I held meetings in Canberra, ACT, Melbourne, Victoria, Sydney, New South Wales and Alice Springs, Northern Territory.

I met with representatives of the Australian Government, State and Territorial Governments, Members of parliament and Senators, judges, representatives of the security forces, the Australian Human Rights Commission and State Human Rights Commissions, indigenous organizations, United Nations entities and international organizations, and non-governmental organizations as well as community members and other groups and individuals working in the field of racism.

Although I did not have the chance to meet Ministers from the Australian Government, I was able to meet with Assistant Ministers as well as State and Territorial Ministers and high-level officials from many Departments at all levels.

More: press-statement-end-visit-australia

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Press Conference audio

International Day For The World’s Indigenous Peoples August 9

 

IDWIP_identifier_EWhen states and religious denominations developed formal education for indigenous peoples, indigenous cultures, languages and practices were often ignored or discouraged. The education sector is a particular arena that not only mirrors and condenses the historical abuses, discrimination and marginalization suffered by indigenous peoples, but also reflects their continued struggle for equality and respect for their rights as peoples and as individuals.

Efforts should be made to ensure that indigenous peoples have access to education IDWIP_photo_card_Ethat is culturally and linguistically appropriate and that does not aim at or result in unwanted assimilation.
Learn more about the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples: http://bit.ly/idwip16

 

THE SECRETARY-GENERAL

MESSAGE ON THE INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE WORLD’S INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
9 August 2016

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by world leaders last year, is predicated on the principle of leaving no one behind in the journey to a world of peace and dignity, opportunity and prosperity. Among those most vulnerable to being left behind are indigenous peoples.

Indigenous peoples face a wide range of challenges including systematic discrimination, denial of their land and territorial rights and inadequate access to essential services. Indigenous peoples regularly face stigmatization of their cultural identity and lack of respect and recognition for their heritage and values, including in textbooks and other educational materials. Their marginalization is often compounded by language barriers. Instruction is mainly in the national language, with little or no instruction in, or recognition of, indigenous languages.

This has grave consequences. Around the globe, indigenous youth are graduating from high school at rates well below the national average. In some countries, less than 40 per cent of indigenous children attend school full-time. In many others, few indigenous children complete a full high school education. This is unacceptable. We will not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals if we fail to address the educational needs of indigenous peoples.

In recent decades, the world has progressed considerably in advocating for the rights of indigenous peoples. The United Nations now has three specific mechanisms to advance their cause: the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; and the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. We also have the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Adopted by the General Assembly on 13 September 2007, the Declaration is the definitive benchmark for the recognition, promotion and protection of the rights of indigenous peoples.

In September 2014, the first World Conference on Indigenous Peoples adopted an action oriented outcome document to achieve the ends of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. As a direct result we now have a UN System Wide Action Plan to promote awareness and action to support the implementation of the UN Declaration, particularly at the country level.

On this International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, I call on Governments everywhere to draw on the guidance of this international framework to improve access to education for indigenous people and to reflect their experiences and culture in places of learning. Let us commit to ensuring indigenous peoples are not left behind as we pursue the vision of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Free & Equal Global Film Series

The Free & Equal Global Film Series is a collection of documentaries and narrative films that explore the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people in different parts of the world. Continue reading

Discrimination against autistic persons, the rule rather than the exception

World Autism Awareness Day 2 AprilTwo United Nations human rights experts today called for an end to discrimination against autistic persons and a celebration of diversity. Speaking ahead of World Autism Awareness Day, the Special Rapporteurs on the rights of persons with disabilities, Catalina Devandas Aguilar, and on the right to health, Dainius Pūras, noted that about one per cent of the world’s population -some 70 million people- is estimated to be on the autism spectrum worldwide. “As part of human diversity, autistic persons should be embraced, celebrated and respected. However, discrimination against autistic children and adults is more the rule rather than the exception. Continue reading