Tag Archives: Michel Sidibé

WORLD AIDS DAY MESSAGE 2017

Michel Sidibé
Executive Director of UNAIDS
Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations

This World AIDS Day, we are highlighting the importance of the right to health and the challenges that people living with and affected by HIV face in fulfilling that right.

The right to health is a fundamental human right—everybody has the right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health, as enshrined in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

The world will not achieve the Sustainable Development Goals—which include the target of ending AIDS by 2030—without people attaining their right to health. The right to health is interrelated with a range of other rights, including the rights to sanitation, food, decent housing, healthy working conditions and a clean environment.

The right to health means many different things: that no one person has a greater right to health care than anyone else; that there is adequate health-care infrastructure; that health-care services are respectful and non-discriminatory; and that health care must be medically appropriate and of good quality. But the right to health is more than that—by attaining the right to health, people’s dreams and promises can be fulfilled.

On every World AIDS Day, we look back to remember our family members and friends who have died from AIDS-related illnesses and recommit our solidarity with all who are living with or affected by HIV.

From the beginning, the AIDS response was built on the fundamental right to health and well-being. The AIDS community advocated for rights-based systems for health and to accelerate efforts for the world to understand HIV: how to prevent it and how to treat it.

Too many people—especially those who are the most marginalized and most affected by HIV—still face challenges in accessing the health and social services they urgently need. We all must continue to stand shoulder to shoulder with the people being left behind and demand that no one is denied their human rights.

This year has seen significant steps on the way to meeting the 90–90–90 treatment targets towards ending AIDS by 2030. Nearly 21 million people living with HIV are now on treatment and new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths are declining in many parts of the world. But we shouldn’t be complacent. In eastern Europe and central Asia, new HIV infections have risen by 60% since 2010 and AIDS-related deaths by 27%. Western and central Africa is still being left behind. Two out of three people are not accessing treatment. We cannot have a two-speed approach to ending AIDS.

For all the successes, AIDS is not yet over. But by ensuring that everyone, everywhere accesses their right to health, it can be.

Asia-Pacific countries commit to ending AIDS by 2030

An estimated 6 million people are living with HIV in Asia and the Pacific and only 33 percent of them are receiving treatment, often due to legal and policy barriers in accessing HIV services. Against this backdrop, some 30 countries from the region pledged this week to accelerate the pace of change and committed to ending the AIDS epidemic in the region by 2030 during the Asia-Pacific Intergovernmental Meeting on HIV and AIDS. Continue reading

UNAIDS framework to accelerate access to HIV treatment

Peer educator discusses HIV/AIDS prevention and other STDs in Barangay Don Carlos, a poor neighbourhood in Pasay City, Philippines. Photo: UNICEFThe Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has launched a new framework to accelerate action in reaching 15 million people with antiretroviral treatment by 2015 – the goal set by United Nations Member States in 2011. The framework, entitled Treatment 2015, offers countries and partners both practical and Continue reading

Record number of people with HIV accessing treatment

An HIV/AIDS mural in Belize. Photo: UNDP videoNearly 10 million people living with HIV were accessing antiretroviral treatment last year, says a new United Nations report, which notes that even more people can be reached with smart planning. Last year’s figure represents the biggest increase from one year to another as numbers of people accessing antiretroviral treatment rose by 1.6 million from 2011 to 2012, Continue reading

New HIV infections among children have been reduced by 50% or more in seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa

In Lesotho, A woman holds the AIDS anti-retroviral treatment medicine for her granddaughter. Photo: IRIN/Eva-Lotta JanssonA new report on the Global Plan towards elimination of new HIV infections among children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive (Global Plan) has revealed a marked increase in progress in stopping new infections in children across the Global Plan priority countries in Africa. The report outlines that seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa Continue reading