Tag Archives: migrants

UN’s Coming Together Campaign in Canberra – In the Lead Up to International Women’s Day

On March 1, in the lead up to International Women’s Day, the United Nations Information Centre Canberra, International Organization for Migration, the Canberra Multicultural Community Forum and the Canberra Multicultural Women Forum held a community event to promote the ‘Together, Safety and Dignity for All Initiative’ . It was also an opportunity to promote the recent establishment of the Canberra Multicultural Women’s Forum. The rest of the story is here also on our website.

UN’s Coming Together Campaign in Canberra – In the Lead Up to International Women’s Day

On March 1, in the lead up to International Women’s Day, the United Nations Information Centre Canberra, International Organization for Migration, the Canberra Multicultural Community Forum and the Canberra Multicultural Women Forum held a community event to promote the ‘Together, Safety and Dignity for All Initiative’ . It was also an opportunity to promote the recent establishment of the Canberra Multicultural Women’s Forum (the Women’s Forum).

Opening the event the Chair of the Women’s Forum, Ms Laura Aoun noted that many of the people in the audience were living proof that those from migrant and refugee backgrounds have enriched Canberra and Australia more broadly in ‘more ways than we realize’.

The Director of the UNIC Canberra, Mr Christopher Woodthorpe, noted the similarities between the Women’s forum – which bases it work on equal participation of women from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds – and the UN’s Together Initiative – which seeks to promote the importance of such work. In closing he invited everyone to celebrate women, rejoice in diversity and to come together.

Chief of Mission for IOM, Mr Jo Appiah, in his speech said that “on International Women’s Day the International Organization for Migration (IOM) embraces the official United Nations theme, Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030, by honoring migrant women and girls and called for us all to take a moment to recognize not just their specific contributions but also their challenges”.

Inter-dispersed between speeches the over one hundred strong audience was privy to two fine performances – firstly by the local ACT Chinese Australian Association Ladies Dance Group followed by the pace of some very colorful Colombians.

The keynote speech of the night was given by Her Excellency the High Commissioner of Pakistan, Naela Chohan during which she said that “today there is a growing number of women in conflict situation compelled to become refugees and migrants. It is indeed among the most urgent humanitarian challenges of our times. Much of this displacement has neither been voluntary nor orderly. People particularly women and children have been fleeing from desperate conditions of conflict, war or poverty. These helpless women and children on the move, deserve compassion and humane treatment”.

Joint IOM-UNHCR Statement on President Trump’s Refugee Order

28 January 2017 | Français | عربي

GENEVA – The needs of refugees and migrants worldwide have never been greater, and the U.S. resettlement program is one of the most important in the world.

The longstanding U.S. policy of welcoming refugees has created a win-win situation: it has saved the lives of some of the most vulnerable people in the world who have in turn enriched and strengthened their new societies. The contribution of refugees and migrants to their new homes worldwide has been overwhelmingly positive.

Resettlement places provided by every country are vital. UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, and IOM, the International Organization for Migration, hope that the U.S. will continue its strong leadership role and long tradition of protecting those who are fleeing conflict and persecution.

UNHCR and IOM remain committed to working with the U.S. Administration towards the goal we share to ensure safe and secure resettlement and immigration programmes.

We strongly believe that refugees should receive equal treatment for protection and assistance, and opportunities for resettlement, regardless of their religion, nationality or race.

We will continue to engage actively and constructively with the U.S. Government, as we have done for decades, to protect those who need it most, and to offer our support on asylum and migration matters.

Media contacts:
In Washington, Chris Boian, boian@unhcr.org, +1 202 489 6884
In Geneva, Vannina Maestracci, maestrac@unhcr.org​, +41 79 108 3532

Together, Respect, Safety and Dignity for All Campaign

Diana Rahman, OAM Chair, Canberra Multicultural Community Forum and President of Australian Muslim Voice speaks to UNIC Canberra about being the daughter of migrant parents their influence and her hopes for a tolerant society.  This interview is part of a series that UNIC is undertaking as part of the UN Global ‘Together, Respect, Safety and Dignity For All’ campaign.

For more information on the campaign: together.un.org/

TOGETHER: a global campaign to change perceptions and attitudes towards refugees and migrants

The Secretary-General launched the TOGETHER campaign at the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants on 19 September: All 193 Member States of the United Nations unanimously welcomed the TOGETHER campaign and committed to implementing it. The campaign aims to strengthen the social contract between host countries and communities, and refugees and migrants.

Listen to UNIC Canberra  Together Campaign audio series

The Courage and Resilience of Migrants and Refugees

As part of the UN’s “Together, Respect Safety and Dignity for All” Campaign Belinda Mason Director of the film ‘Constance on the Edge” talks to UNIC Canberra’s Julia Dean about the strength and resilience of migrants – what they have to offer their new communities and how a chat and a hot ‘cup of tea’ may be all that is needed to create new friendships.

The film Constance on the Edge, filmed over 10 years, is an unflinchingly honest portrayal of one refugee family’s resettlement story in Australia. Brave, lion-hearted, charismatic Constance, mother of six, confronts her painful past in war torn Sudan, and risks everything in Australia so her family can thrive.

“All Australians have a role to play in ending racism and xenophobia,” says UN expert

GENEVA (7 December 2016) – United Nations human rights expert Mutuma Ruteere called on all Australians to strengthen efforts to end racism, xenophobia and other forms of racial discrimination in the country, especially against indigenous people, migrants, refugees and asylum-seekers, Muslims, and persons of African descent.

“The elimination of racism, xenophobia and discrimination will not happen unless it is led by the most senior political leadership and unless institutions such as the media play a constructive role,” said the UN Special Rapporteur on racism at the end of a fact-finding visit* to Australia.

International Migrants Day Film Screening and Panel Discussion

(Canberra, 15 December) In celebration of International Migrants Day and as part of the United Nations’ Global Together, Respect Safety and Dignity for All – campaign,  UNIC Canberra together with the International Organization for Migration and UNHCR  presented a public screening of the new Australian documentary Constance On the Edge  followed by a  lively panel discussion.

16-00133d-Together_Refugees and Migrants_Retractable BannerOne family. Two wars. Three countries. What does it take to forge a new life far from home? Filmed over 10 years, Constance on the Edge is an unflinchingly honest portrayal of one refugee family’s resettlement story in Australia. The powerful and emotive film closed to loud applause, with many in the audience visibly moved by the very personal stories that unfolded in the film.

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(L-R) Ms.Natacha Yacoub, Deputy UNHCR Canberra, Mr.Joseph Appiah, Chief Of Mission IOM Australia