Tag Archives: Paris Agreement

Provisional WMO Statement on the Status of the Global Climate in 2016

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wmo-graph-1It is very likely that 2016 will be the hottest year on record, with global temperatures even higher than the record-breaking temperatures in 2015. Preliminary data shows that 2016’s global temperatures are approximately 1.2° Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to an assessment by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Global temperatures for January to September 2016 have been about 0.88° Celsius (1.58°F) above the average (14°C) for the 1961-1990 reference period, which is used by WMO as a baseline. Temperatures spiked in the early months of the year because of the powerful El Niño event of 2015-16. Preliminary data for October indicate that they are at a sufficiently high level for 2016 to remain on track for the title of hottest year on record. This would mean that 16 of the 17 hottest years on record have been this century (1998 was the other one).

United Nations Secretary-General Remarks to the Press

Rome, 6 October 2016

Buon giorno! E un vero piacere essere ancora una volta a Roma, specialmente con il Presidente Mattarella.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I have just had very productive meeting with President Mattarella. Earlier today I also met with the President of the Senate, Pietro Grasso, and the President of the Chambers of Deputies, Laura Boldrini.

We discussed some of the most pressing issues on the international agenda, including Syria, Libya and the refugee and migrant crisis.

Statement by the Secretary-General on the Paris Agreement on climate change

I am delighted to announce that today the Paris Agreement will cross the second and final threshold needed for entry into force, and will enter into force on 4 November 2016.

Global momentum for the Paris Agreement to enter into force in 2016 has been remarkable. What once seemed unthinkable is now unstoppable.

Strong international support for the Paris Agreement entering into force is testament to the urgency for action, and reflects the consensus of governments that robust global cooperation is essential to meet the climate challenge.

Over the past decade, I have worked ceaselessly to bring countries together to accelerate the global response to climate change. I have visited communities on the climate frontlines, from the Arctic to the Amazon, and I have seen how climate impacts are already devastating lives, livelihoods and prospects for a better future.

I urge all governments and all sectors of society to implement the Paris Agreement in full and to take urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, strengthen climate resilience, and support the most vulnerable in adapting to inevitable climate impacts.

I extend my warmest congratulations to all Signatories of the Paris Agreement, and encourage all countries to accelerate their domestic processes to ratify the Paris Agreement as soon as possible before the next Conference of the Parties (COP 22) next month in Marrakesh.

New York, 5 October 2016

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UN Secretary-General Remarks To Media Following  High Level Meeting On The Paris Agreement On Climate Change

New York, 21 September 2016

I am pleased to see you this morning. This is a great day for the planet, for multilateralism and for our sustainable development agenda. We are now very close to bringing the Paris Agreement into force.

Sixty countries have now joined the Paris Agreement. They represent over 47.5 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. We need about 7.5 per cent more of the greenhouse gas emissions accounted.

The thresholds for entry into force are 55 countries representing 55 per cent of global emissions. We have crossed one threshold and the emissions threshold is within reach.

 

PRESS RELEASE Paris Climate Agreement Moves Closer to Entry into Force in 2016

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60 Countries accounting for close to 48 percent of emissions have joined Agreement

New York, 21 September—The Paris Agreement on climate change moved closer toward entering into force in 2016 as 31 more countries joined the agreement today at a special event hosted by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Several large emitting countries, which had not yet completed their domestic approval processes in time for the event, also announced they were committed to joining the agreement this year.

The Paris Agreement will enter into force 30 days after 55 countries, representing 55 percent of global emissions, deposit their instruments of ratification, acceptance or accession with the Secretary-General.

UN Secretary-General Closing Remarks Paris Agreement Event

New York, 21 September 2016

I am heartened by the tremendous support for bringing the Paris Agreement into force this year.
The global coalition that delivered in Paris continues to go from strength to strength.

With this meeting this morning, as of now, we have 60 parties representing, over 47.5% [of global greenhouse gas emissions]. We need 7.5% more.  And that means we have crossed one the two thresholds, the 55 countries, so it’s well over, now let us work harder to get all this 7.5% greenhouse gas emissions added more.   I thank the 31 countries who have deposited their instruments with me today.  I am happy to declare that we have officially crossed one of the two thresholds required to bring the Paris Agreement into force.

Secretary-General’s Press Conference at G20 Summit in China

4 September 2016

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen of the media,

I am very pleased to participate in this G20 Summit meeting in Hangzhou and this morning, I would like to share some thoughts of mine, and the United Nations concerns, which may be your concerns, international concerns.

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at Paris Agreement Ratification Ceremony. From Paris to Hangzhou Ð Climate Response in Action. H.E. Mr. XI Jinping, President of the PeopleÕs Republic of China and H.E. Mr. Barack Obama, President of the United States of America present the instrument for the Paris Agreement to the Secretary-General.

This is my eleventh G20 Summit as Secretary-General of the United Nations. As you may know, this is one of the few last months for me as Secretary-General of the United Nations. My mandate ends 31 December, so this is will be my last G20 Summit meeting.

Ladies and gentlemen, first of all, I would like to begin by congratulating President Xi Jinping and Chinese people and Government for successfully hosting and wonderfully organizing this G20 Summit meeting and I welcome the Summit’s focus on the Sustainable Development Goals – our new framework to advance peace and prosperity for all of us and for a healthy planet.

I continue to urge all countries to align their national policies, socio-economic policies, programmes and investment behind these Sustainable Development Goals.

Global Climate Breaks New Records January to June 2016

nasa_press-release1Geneva, 21 July 2016 (WMO) _ Global temperatures for the first six months of this year shattered yet more records, and mean that 2016 is on track to be the world’s hottest year on record.

Arctic sea ice melted early and fast, another indicator of climate change. Carbon dioxide levels, which are driving global warming, have reached new highs.

Two separate reports from the U.S National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (NASA GISS) both highlighted the dramatic and sweeping changes in the state of the climate.

June 2016 marked the 14th consecutive month of record heat for land and oceans. It marked the 378th consecutive month with temperatures above the 20th century average. The last month with temperatures below the 20th century average was December 1984.

United Nations Secretary General Press Conference – Content of report on conflict-affected children ‘will not change,’ asserts Ban

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Sspeaks to the Media at Security Council stakeout on a wide range of topics

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Sspeaks to the Media at Security Council stakeout on a wide range of topics 

9 June 2016 – Standing by his decision to remove the Saudi-led Coalition in Yemen from his latest report on conflict-affected children, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today said it was one of the most ‘painful and difficult decisions’ he has ever had to make, and that it is ‘unacceptable’ for Member States to exert undue pressure as scrutiny is necessary part of the work of the UN.

“The report describes horrors no child should have to face,” said Mr. Ban speaking to the press outside of the UN Security Council chamber, where he acknowledged that the “fierce reaction to my decision to temporarily remove the Saudi-led Coalition countries from the report’s annex.”

“At the same time, I also had to consider the very real prospect that millions of other children would suffer grievously if, as was suggested to me, countries would de-fund many UN programmes. Children already at risk in Palestine, South Sudan, Syria, Yemen and so many other places would fall further into despair,” he stressed.

Insisting that he stands by the report, the UN chief added that the Organization “will assess the complaints that have been made, but the content will not change.”

“I fully understand the criticism, but I would also like to make a larger point that speaks to many political challenges we face. When UN peacekeepers come under physical attack, they deserve strong backing by the Security Council,” he stated. “When UN personnel are declared persona non grata simply for carrying out their jobs, they should be able to count on firm support from the Member States,” he said.

Mr. Ban also underlined that when a UN report comes “under fire” for raising difficult issues or documenting violations of law or human rights, Member States should defend the mechanisms and mandates that they themselves have established.

“As the Secretariat carries forward the work that is entrusted to us, I count on Member States to work constructively and maintain their commitment to the cause of this Organization,” he told reporters.